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List of Jupiter's Moons


Jupiter has the most moons of any planet in the Solar System. 63 moons have so far been discovered in orbit of the giant planet. These are listed in the table below in order of distance from closest to furthest from Jupiter. Because there are so many, they are put into categories with other similar moons. The colours in the table of moons correspond with the groups in the guide below.

Amalthea Group Jupiter's four inner moons. Their orbits are very circular and not very inclined. They orbit in the same direction as Jupiter spins. These orbit closely to Jupiter's rings and are likely to be made up from and also make up the material in the rings.
Galilean Group Jupiter's four largest moons, discovered by Galileo Galilei in 1610. These are the only four spherical moons of Jupiter. Two of these moons (Ganymede and Callisto) are the two largest moons in the Solar System.
Not Grouped These moons don't share any orbital similarities to any other moons of Jupiter so are not placed into any of the groups.
Himalia Group Five moons with a prograde orbit, with an inclination of about 27.5 degrees. Himalia is likely to be a captured asteroid which was involved in collisions. These collisions caused fragments to break off the asteroid, forming the other smaller moons in the group.
Ananke Group Moons with retrograde orbits between 18 million kilometres to 22 million kilometres from Jupiter, inclined at 145.7 to 154.8 degrees. Ananke is believed to be an asteroid captured by Jupiter and involved in a collision. The fragments that broke off from it formed the other moons in the group.
Carme Group Retrograde moons orbiting at a distance of 23 to 24 million kilometres from Jupiter, inclined at 166 degrees. These moons are believed to have been created by an impact with the moon Carme. Most of Carme still exists but the fragments created the other moons.
Pasiphaë Group Retrograde moons orbiting at a distance of 23 to 24 million kilometres from Jupiter, inclined at 144.5 to 158.3 degrees. They are believed to have formed from an asteroid about 60 km. Most of this asteroid is still the moon Pasiphae.




Name of moon Average Distance from Jupiter Length of time to complete an Orbit Diameter Year of Discovery and Discoverer Origin of moon's name
Metis 128,100 km (79,598 miles) 7 hrs, 4 mins, 29 secs 44 km (27 miles) 4th March 1979, Stephen Synnott from Voyager 1 images In mythology, Metis was a Titaness and the first wife of Zeus (Zeus is the Roman equivalent of Jupiter). Metis received its name in 1983.
Adrastea 128,900 km (80,095 miles) 7 hrs, 9 mins, 30 secs 16 km (10 miles) 8th July 1979, David C. Jewitt and G. Edward Danielson from Voyager 2 images Daughter of Zeus (Jupiter) and Ananke. Adrastea is the goddess of necessity. Its spelling in mythology is actually Adrasteia. Adrastea received its name in 1983. Previous to that, another of Jupiter's moons, Ananke, was sometimes known as Adrastea until it received its name.
Amalthea 181,400 km (112,716 miles) 11 hrs, 57 mins, 23 secs 168 km (104 miles) 9th September 1892, Edward Emerson Barnard Foster-mother of Zeus, sometimes represented as a goat. The first moon of Jupiter to be discovered after the Galilean satellites almost 300 years earlier and the last to be found by traditional observation through a telescope. It officially received its name in 1975.
Thebe 221,900 km (137,883 miles) 16 hrs, 11 mins, 17 secs 98 km (61 miles) 5th March 1979, Stephen Synnott from Voyager 1 images (the moon was later found on images dating from 27th February 1979) Nypmh, daughter of Asopus and Metope. Wife of Zethus and lover of Zeus (Jupiter). Zeus and Iodame also had a daughter called Thebe. Thebe was named in 1983.
Io 421,800 km (262,094 miles) 1.77 days 3,643 km (2,264 miles) 7th January 1610, Galileo Galilei Priestess of Hera, lover of Zeus. Io was first named in 1614 by Simon Marius, but was mostly referred to as Jupiter I, or "the first satellite of Jupiter" until Io was once again used in the mid-20th Century.
Europa 671,100 km (417,002 miles) 3.55 days 3,122 km (1,940 miles) 7th January 1610, Galileo Galilei A noblewoman of Phoenicia, courted by Zeus. She became Queen of Crete (in mythology, not real life!). Europa was initially named by Simon Marius who made his own observations of Jupiter's four largest moons, but the name wasn't commonly used until the mid-20th Century. Instead, it was referred to as Jupiter II.
Themisto 750700 km (466,463 miles) 130 days 9 km (5.6 miles) 30th September 1975, Charles Kowai and Elizabeth Roemer. Discovered again on 21st November 2000, Scott Sheppard, David Jewitt, Yanga Fernández and Eugene Magnier. Daughter of the River god Inachus. It received its name in 2002. The reason it wasn't named sooner was that after its first observation in 1975, the moon was lost and wasn't found again until 2000!
Ganymede 1,070,400 km (665,116 miles) 7.16 days 5,262 km (3,270 miles) 11th January 1610, Galileo Galilei Trojan prince, son of King Tros. Served as cupbearer to the gods, transported to the heavens by Zeus, who was in the form of an eagle. Ganymede is the only moon of Jupiter named after a male figure. Its name was chosen by Simon Marius but wasn't commonly used until the mid-20th Century. It was instead known as Jupiter III, or "the third satellite of Jupiter."
Callisto 1,882,700 km (1,169,856 miles) 16.69 days 4,821 km (2,996 miles) 7th January 1610, Galileo Galilei A nymph, associated with Artemis, the goddess of the hunt. Simon Marius, who also claimed to discover Jupiter's moons, chose the name Callisto but this name wasn't commonly used until the mid-20th Century. Up to then, it was known as Jupiter IV (4), or "the fourth satellite of Jupiter."
Leda 11,165,000 km (6,937,609 miles) 240.9 days 18 km (11 miles) 14th September 1974, Charles Kowai from photographs taken from Mount Palomar Observatory between 11th - 13th September 1974) Lover of Zeus (Jupiter). Zeus came to Leda as a swan (Zeus is kind of like a Transformer!). Its name was suggested by its discoverer, Charles Kowai, and was officially named in 1975.
Himalia 11,461,000 km (7,121,535 miles) 250.6 days 160 km (99 miles) 3rd December 1904, Charles Dillon Perrine at Lick Observatory in California. A nymph from Cyprus. Gave birth to three of Zeus' (Jupiter's) sons. Himalia was officially named in 1975 despite calls to give it a proper name shortly after the discovery of it and Elara a month later. It was the 6th moon to be discovered around Jupiter so was known as Jupiter VI (6), but the traditional naming system was getting confusing. Jupiter V (5) was closer to Jupiter than Jupiter I (1), II (2), III (3) and IV (4). Jupiter VI (6) came after Jupiter IV (4) in its orbit around Jupiter. Between 1955 and 1975, it was sometimes known as Hestia (a Greek goddess)
Lysithea 11,717,000 km (7,280,606 miles) 259.2 days 38 km (24 miles) 6th July 1938, Seth Barnes Nicholson at Mount Wilson Observatory in California. One of Zeus' lovers, daughter of Oceanus. It was officially named in 1975, before being known as Jupiter X (10, as it was the tenth moon to be discovered around Jupiter). Between 1955 and 1975, it was sometimes called Demeter.
Elara 11,741,000 km (7,295,519 miles) 259.6 days 78 km (48 miles) 2nd January 1905, Charles Dillon Perrine at Lick Observatory in California. Mother of Tityas (a giant) and daughter of King Orchomenus. She was a lover of Zeus who hid her from his wife deep beneath the Earth. Seems like a nice man! This is where she somehow gave birth to Tityas. It was officially named in 1975 although was previously known as Jupiter VII (7) or Hera (between 1955 and 1975)
S/2000 J11 12,555,000 km (7,801,315 miles) 290.9 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2000, Scott Sheppard and his team of sheep astronomers. Not yet named
Carpo 16,989,000 km (10,556,475 miles) 456.1 days 3 km (1.86 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Daughter of Zeus and one of the first generation of Horae (three goddesses controlling orderly life). Received its name in March 2005.
S/2003 J3 18,339,885 km (11,395,876 miles) 504 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Not yet named
S/2003 J12 19,002,480 km (11,807,594 miles) 533.3 days 1 km (0.62 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Not yet named
Euporie 19,302,000 km (11,993,707 miles) 550.7 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Daughter of Zeus and one of the third generation of Horae, a goddess of abundance. (What's abundance? A disco for cakes!). It received its name in August 2003.
S/2003 J18 20,700,000 km (12,862,384 miles) 606.3 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, Brett Gladman and his team of astronomers Not yet named
Orthosie 20,721,000 km (12,875,432 miles) 622.6 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Daughter of Zeus, goddess of prosperity and one of the third generation of Horae. It received its name in August 2003.
Euanthe 20,799,000 km (12,923,899 miles) 620.6 days 3 km (1.86 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Euanthe was mother of the graces (goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity and fertility). It received its name in August 2003.
Thyone 20,940,000 km (13,011,513 miles) 627.3 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Mother of Dionysus. Zeus fell in love with Thyone (who was called Semele at the time). If mortals saw Zeus as a god, they perished. Zeus was usually in the form of an eagle when with Semele, but Semele repeatedly asked Zeus to prove himself as a god. So he did, and she went to Hades, but was later rescued by Dionysus. She became goddess of Mount Olympus, now with the name Thyone! The moon Thyone received its name in August 2003.
Mneme 21,069,000 km (13,091,670 miles) 620 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard One of 9 muses, who inspire the creation process through music and dance. The Moon Mneme received its name in March 2005. Just in case you're wondering, it's pronounced "nee-mee".
Harpalyke 21,105,000 km (13,114,039 miles) 623.3 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2000, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Daughter of Klymenos, who also married her. She gave birth to a son called Presbon. It received its name in August 2003.
Hermippe 21,131,000 km (13,130,195 miles) 633.9 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Lover of Zeus (Jupiter), mother of Orchomenus. It received its name in August 2003
Praxidike 21,147,000 km (13,140,137 miles) 625.3 days 7 km (4.35 miles) 2000, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Greek goddess of punishment. It received its name in August 2003.
Thelxinoe 21,162,000 km (13,149,457 miles) 628.1 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2004, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard (moon was found in images from 2003) One of the 4 original muses. Received its name in March 2005.
Iocaste 21,269,000 km (13,215,944 miles) 631.5 days 5 km (3.1 miles) 2000, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Named after Jocaste, the mother and wife of Oedipus (Oedipus was unaware that Jocaste was his mother as he was abandoned as a child and didn't know who she when they married). The moon received its name in October 2002.
Helike 21,263,000 km (13,212,216 miles) 634.8 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard A nymph who nurtured Zeus (Jupiter) as an infant in Crete. Helike was named in March 2005
Ananke 21,276,000 km (13,220,293 miles) 610.5 days 28 km (17 miles) 1951, Seth Barnes Nicholson at Mount Wilson Observatory in California. Lover of Zeus, mother of Adrastea. This moon was officially named in 1975, although was referred to as Jupiter XII up to then. It was also sometimes known as Adrastea, now the name of the second closest moon of Jupiter.
S/2003 J15 22,000,000 km (13,670,166 miles) 668.4 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Not yet named
S/2003 J17 22,000,000 km (13,670,166 miles) 690.3 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, Brett Gladman and his team of astronomers Not yet named
S/2003 J9 22,441,680 km (13,944,613 miles) 683 days 1 km (0.62 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Not yet named
S/2003 J19 22,800,000 km (14,167,263 miles) 701.3 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, Brett Gladman and his team of astronomers Not yet named
Eurydome 22,865,000 km (14,207,652 miles) 717.3 days 3 km (1.86 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Eurydome is often known as the mother of the graces in Greek mythology. Their father is Zeus (Jupiter). The moon was named in August 2003.
Arche 22,931,000 km (14,248,663 miles) 723.9 days 3 km (1.86 miles) 2002, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard One of the four original muses. It received its name in 2005.
Autonoe 23,039,000 km (14,315,771 miles) 762.7 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Mother of the charites, a conquest of Zeus (Jupiter). Received its name in August 2003.
Pasithee 23,096,000 km (14,351,189 miles) 719.5 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard One of the charites, or graces, goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, humans creativity and fertility. Daughter of Zeus and Eurydome. The moon received its name in August 2003.
Chaldene 23,179,000 km (14,402,762 miles) 723.8 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2000, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Mother of Solymus. Another of Zeus' lovers. It was named in October 2002.
Kale 23,217,000 km (14,426,375 miles) 729.5 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard One of the charites, or graces. Named in August 2003.
Isonoe 23,217,000 km (14,426,375 miles) 725.5 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2000, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard A lover of Zeus and one of the Danaides (one of the 50 daughters of Danaus and Pieria). The moons received its name in October 2002.
Aitne 23,231,000 km (14,435,074 miles) 730.2 days 3 km (1.86 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Divine personification of Mount Etna. Her sons are the Palici, the Scicilian gods of geysers. It was named in August 2003.
S/2003 J4 23,257,920 km (14,451,801 miles) 723.2 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Not yet named
Erinome 23,279,000 km (14,464,900 miles) 728.3 days 3 km (1.86 miles) 2000, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Named after the Roman mythological character, Erinome, a lover of Jupiter. Named in October 2002.
Taygete 23,360,000 km (14,515,231 miles) 732.2 days 5 km (3.1 miles) 2000, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard One of the Pleiades (the 7 daughters of Atlas the Titan and Pleione). Lover of Zeus and mother of Lacedaemon.
Carme 23,404,000 km (14,542,571 miles) 702.3 days 46 km (29 miles) 30th July 1938, Seth Barnes Nicholson at Mount Wilson Observatory Lover of Zeus (aren't they all?) and mother of Britomartis, a goddess of Crete. It received its name in 1975, known as Jupiter XI beforehand, or sometimes Pan between 1955 to 1975. Pan is now the name of a moon of Saturn.
Sponde 23,487,000 km (14,594,145 miles) 748.3 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2001, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Sponde is one of the Horae, or Hours, goddesses of the different times of the day. Sponde was goddess of the seventh hour of the day a time when a libation, or pouring of a drink as an offering to the gods, was made after lunch. The Horae are all daughters of Zeus and Themis. The moon received its name in August 2003.
Kalyke 23,583,000 km (14,653,797 miles) 743 days 5 km (3.1 miles) 2000, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Kalyke (also spelt Calyce in mythology) was the mother of Endymion. Either Zeus or Kalyke's husband Aethlius was the father. In other sources, she is the mother of Aethlius, not his wife, and didn't give birth to Endymion. The moon received its name in October 2002.
Pasiphae 23,624,000 km (14,679,273 miles) 708 days 58 km (36 miles) 28th February 1908, Philibert Jacques Melotte from plates taken at the Royal Greenwich Observatory. It was later spotted on a plate dated from 27th January 1908 but not designated as a moon until 10th April. Wife of Minos and mother of the Minotaur. It received its name in 1975, but beforehand was sometimes known as Jupiter VIII (8) or Poseidon (from 1955).
Eukelade 23,661,000 km (14,702,264 miles) 746.4 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard One of the muses, a daughter of Zeus (Jupiter). Received its name In March 2005.
Megaclite 23,806,000 km (14,792,362 miles) 752.8 days 6 km (3.73 miles) 2000, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Lover of Zeus and mother of Thebe and Locrus. Named in October 2002.
Sinope 23,939,000 km (14,875,005 miles) 724.5 days 38 km (24 miles) 21st July 1914, Seth Barnes Nicholson at Lick Observatory, California A daughter of Asopus, abducted by Zeus who abducted her and took her to the site that later became known as the city of Sinope on the Black Sea. Named in 1975, before which being known as Jupiter IX and sometimes, from 1955, Hades.
Hegemone 23,947,000 km (14,879,975 miles) 739.6 days 3 km (1.86 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard One of the graces, a daughter of Zeus (Jupiter). Named in March 2005.
Aoede 23,981,000 km (14,901,102 miles) 761.5 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard One of the muses, a daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne. Named in March 2005.
Kallichore 24,043,000 km (14,939,627 miles) 764.7 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard A Nysiad, one of the nymphs that nursed Dionysus. Named in March 2005.
S/2003 J23 24,055,500 km (14,947,394 miles) 759.7 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Not yet named
S/2003 J5 24,084,180 km (14,965,215 miles) 759.7 days 4 km (2.48 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Not yet named
Callirrhoe 24,102,000 km (14,976,288 miles) 758.8 days 7 km (4.35 miles) 6th October 1999, Spacewatch (a project studying asteroids and comets). Discovered to be a moon of Jupiter on 18th July 2000 by TIm Spahr. Daughter of river god Achelus. A lover - amongst many - of Zeus (Jupiter). Named in October 2002.
S/2003 J10 24,249,600 km (15,068,002 miles) 767 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Not yet named
Cyllene 24,349,000 km (15,129,767 miles) 737.8 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard A water nymph (a naiad), or mountain nymph (an oread). Associated with Mount Kyllini in Greece. A daughter of Zeus (Jupiter). The moon received its name in March 2005.
Kore 24,543,000 km (15,250,313 miles) 779.2 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard Kore is another name for the greek goddess Persephone. Daughter of Demeter and Zeus. Named in March 2005.
S/2003 J2 28,570,410 km (17,752,829 miles) 982.5 days 2 km (1.24 miles) 2003, astronomers at University of Hawaii headed by Scott Sheppard and David Jewitt Not yet named



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